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The Pros and Cons of US Universities Operating Campuses and Centers in Authoritarian Countries

October 24, 2019

 

 

 

Join us for our 13th Public Voices event on the pros and cons of US universities opening campuses and centers in countries with authoritarian regimes.   

 

Monday, December 2, 2019

6:00 - 8:00 PM

The New School

Theresa Lang Center

Room I-202

55 W. 13th Street

New York, NY 10011
 

REGISTER HERE

 

Panelists

Teng Biao, Grove Human Rights Scholar, Hunter College, City University of New York; President, China Against the Death Penalty

 

Eli Friedman, Associate Professor of International and Comparative Labor, Industrial and Labor Relations School, Cornell University, and Member of Cornell China Center Faculty Advisory Committee

 

Carol Kim, Senior Vice President for Global Partnerships, The New School

 

William C. Kirby, Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration; T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies; Chairman, Harvard China Fund, Harvard University

 

Pericles Lewis, Vice President and Vice Provost for Global Strategy; Douglas Tracy Smith Professor of Comparative Literature, Yale University; founding President, Yale-National University of Singapore

 

Denis Simon, Executive Vice Chancellor, Duke Kunshan University

 

Catharine Stimpson, University Professor and Dean Emerita of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New York University; affiliated faculty member, NYU Abu Dhabi
 


___________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Moderators

Jonathan Fanton, former President, The New School, MacArthur Foundation, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences

 

Aryeh Neier, President Emeritus, Open Society Foundations; former Executive Director, Human Rights Watch

 

Kenneth Prewitt, Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs, Columbia School of International and Public Affairs

 


___________________________________________________________________________________________

 

BIOGRAPHIES

 

Teng Biao, Grove Human Rights Scholar, Hunter College, City University of New York; President, China Against the Death Penalty

 

Teng Biao is an academic, a lawyer and a human rights activist. He was formerly a Lecturer at the China University of Political Science and Law, a visiting Fellow at Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Since 2003, Teng has provided counsel in numerous human rights cases, including those of rural rights advocate Chen Guangcheng, rights defender Hu Jia, the religious freedom case of Falun Gong, and numerous death penalty cases. He co-founded the “Open Constitution Initiative” (Gongmeng) and is also the founder and President of China Against the Death Penalty.

 

Eli Friedman, Associate Professor of International and Comparative Labor, Industrial and Labor Relations School, Cornell University, and Member of Cornell China Center Faculty Advisory Committee

 

Eli Friedman is an Associate Professor in the Department of International and Comparative Labor at the Industrial and Labor Relations School at Cornell University. His primary areas of interest are China, development, education, social movements, urbanization, and work and labor. He is also Director of the Industrial and Labor Relations School’s International Programs, which oversees the school's international activities. He is a member of the university-level ethics of engagement committee in Cornell's International Council. He is the author of Insurgency Trap: Labor Politics in Postsocialist China (Cornell University Press, 2014).

 

Carol Kim, Senior Vice President for Global Partnerships, The New School

 

Carol Kim is Senior Vice President for Global Partnerships at The New School after previously serving as Vice President for Strategic Enrollment Management from 2015 to 2018. In her current role, Carol is charged with leading the strategic direction of the University's global growth and establishing a branch campus in China. Carol has held senior executive leadership positions at Tenlegs,; at YueCheng Education in Beijing, China, as the inaugural vice president of Planning & Communications; and at the California Institute of the Arts, as the inaugural Dean of Enrollment Management and then as the inaugural Vice President of International Relations.

 

William C. Kirby, Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School; T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies; Chairman, Harvard China Fund, Harvard University

 

William C. Kirby is the T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies at Harvard University, and Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. Professor Kirby serves as Chairman of the Harvard China Fund and Faculty Chair of the Harvard Center Shanghai. At Harvard, he has served as Director of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Chairman of the History Department, and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. He serves on the Board of Directors of Cabot Corporation; The China Fund, Inc.; The Taiwan Fund, Inc.; the American Council of Learned Societies; and Harvard University Press. He chairs the Academic Advisory Council for Schwarzman Scholars at Tsinghua University and serves as Senior Advisor on China to Duke University. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent book is Can China Lead? (Harvard Business Review Press, 2014).

 

Pericles Lewis, Vice President and Vice Provost for Global Strategy; Douglas Tracy Smith Professor of Comparative Literature, Yale University; founding President, Yale-National University of Singapore

 

Pericles Lewis is the Douglas Tracy Smith Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of English, and serves as Vice President and Vice Provost for Global Strategy at Yale University. From 2012 to 2017, Professor Lewis served as founding president of Yale-NUS College, a collaboration between Yale and the National University of Singapore. He is the author of numerous article and books. His most recent book is, Religious Experience and the Modernist Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Denis Simon, Executive Vice Chancellor, Duke Kunshan University

 

Denis Simon is Executive Vice Chancellor of Duke Kunshan University, a Sino-U.S. joint venture based in the city of Kunshan, Jiangsu Province, China. He also is Professor of China Business and Technology at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. Dr. Simon joined Duke Kunshan University from Arizona State University, where he had served as Senior Adviser to the President for China-related Strategic Initiatives, Executive Director of the University Design Institute, and Foundation Professor of Contemporary Chinese Affairs in the School of Politics and Global Studies. In 2006, he received the China National Friendship Award from former Premier Wen Jiabao, China. Most recently, he co-authored the book Innovation in China: Challenging the Global Science and Technology System (Polity, 2018).

 

Catharine Stimpson, University Professor and Dean Emerita of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New York University; affiliated faculty member, NYU Abu Dhabi

 

Catharine R. Stimpson is University Professor at New York University, Senior Fellow at the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy, an affiliated member of the New York University Law School faculty, and for 8 years, an affiliated member of the NYU Abu Dhabi faculty. She is also Dean Emerita of the NYU Graduate School of Arts and Science. She is currently chair of the board of Scholars at Risk. Previously, she served as Director of the Fellows Program at the MacArthur Foundation in Chicago from 1994 to 1997 and University Professor at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey-New Brunswick, where, from 1986-1992, she was dean of the Graduate School and Vice Provost for Graduate Education. Her most recent publication is, Critical Terms for the Study of Gender, co-edited with Gilbert Herdt (UChicago Press, 2014). 

 

Jonathan Fanton, former President, The New School, MacArthur Foundation, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences

 

Jonathan Fanton is the President Emeritus of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Previously, he served as the Franklin D. Roosevelt Visiting Fellow and Interim Director at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. He was President of The MacArthur Foundation from 1999-2009, and for 17 years was President of The New School for Social Research. Dr. Fanton has authored several books, including Foundations and Civil Society, Volumes I and II (MacArthur Foundation, 2008) and The University and Civil Society, Volumes I and II (New School for Social Research, 1995, 2002). He is also co-editor of John Brown: Great Lives Observed (Prentice Hall, 1973) and The Manhattan Project: A Documentary Introduction to the Atomic Age (McGraw-Hill, 1991). He is currently a Fellow at Hunter College and The New School for Social Research.

 

Aryeh Neier, President Emeritus, Open Society Foundations; former Executive Director, Human Rights Watch

 

Aryeh Neier is president emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. He was president from 1993 to 2012. Before that, he served for 12 years as Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, which he co-founded in 1978. He worked for 15 years at the American Civil Liberties Union, including eight years as national Executive Director. He served as an adjunct professor of law at New York University for more than a dozen years, and taught at Georgetown University Law School and the University of Siena (Italy). From 2012-2017, he served as Distinguished Visiting Professor at Sciences Po in the Paris School of International Affairs. He is the author of 10 books, including his most recent, The International Human Rights Movement: A History (Princeton University Press, 2012).

 

Kenneth Prewitt, Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs, Columbia School of International and Public Affairs

 

Kenneth Prewitt is the Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs at the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs. He taught Political Science at the University of Chicago from 1965–1982, and served on the faculty of Washington University (1963-1964), Stanford University (1964-1969), Makerere University (1965-1966), the University of Nairobi (1970-1973), and the Graduate Faculty at the New School University, where he was also Dean (2001-2002). Prewitt was the Director of the United States Census Bureau from 1998-2001, Senior Vice President of the Rockefeller Foundation from 1985-1995, the President of the Social Science Research Council from 1979-1985, and the Director of the National Opinion Research Center from 1976-1979. His most recent book is, What’s Your Race: The Census and our Flawed Efforts to Classify  Americans, and he is currently completing a book entitled, Counting the Races of America: Do We Still Need To? Do We Still Want To? (forthcoming).

 

 

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